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Wednesday, October 16, 2013

VIDEO - CROHN'S COLITIS CELIAC DISEASE : SUGAR - #1 DEAD FOOD







HI. THANKS FOR SHOWING INTEREST IN MY BLOG. I AM NOT A DOCTOR NOR DO I PRETEND TO BE. I HAVE NO CREDENTIALS OF ANY KIND RELATED TO THE TOPICS I TALK ABOUT. THIS IS NOT AN ADVICE BLOG, AS I'M NOT DISPENSING ANY ADVICE ABOUT ANYTHING. IF YOU PERCEIVE I'M GIVING ANY ADVICE, THEN PERCEIVE THIS: NEVER TRUST THE PERCEIVED ADVICE OF A STRANGER ON THE INTERNET, IS MY ADVICE. THIS BLOG IS NOT TRYING TO DIAGNOSE ANY DISEASE OR PRESCRIBE ANY COURSE OF ACTION. DON'T ASSUME OR CONCLUDE MY STORY IS YOUR STORY. IT ISN'T. DON'T CONCLUDE THAT WHAT WORKED FOR ME WILL WORK FOR YOU. MOST PROBABLY, IT WON'T WORK FOR YOU. YOU'RE YOU AND I'M ME AND THIS IS JUST A STORY I'VE WRITTEN. ALWAYS CONSULT WITH YOUR DOCTOR ABOUT ANY HEALTH CONCERNS YOU HAVE, USE UP THE ENTIRE PRESCRIPTION YOU'VE BEEN GIVEN, AND NEVER STOP YOUR TREATMENT OR ADD OR TAKE AWAY ANYTHING FROM YOUR FOOD OR SUPPLEMENT CHOICES WITHOUT FIRST CONSULTING WITH YOUR DOCTOR. AMEN.


REFERENCES : VIDEOS TO WATCH

"SUGAR: THE BITTER TRUTH" by Dr. Robert Luster is now viewable on YouTube. www.uctv.com Copy and paste to view video on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=sugar+the+bitter+truth+&sm=1

"IS SUGAR TOXIC?" 60 minutes Investigates TV program. Dr. Sanjay Gupta interviews Dr. Robert Luster. Copy and paste to view video on YouTube:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6n29ZIJ-jQA

"FAT CHANCE: FRUCTOSE 2.0" www.uctv.com Copy and paste to view YouTube video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ceFyF9px20

The Men Who Made Us Fat ''Episode 1/3'' https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E6nGlLUBkOQ

The Men Who Made Us Fat ''Episode 2/3'' https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=owekbSp7wU0

The Men Who Made Us Fat ''Episode 3/3'' https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZlQHXkOUjeI

BOOKS TO READ

"Pure, White and Deadly", by John Yudkin



HOW SWEET IT ISN'T

Thank you to Chris Woolston who wrote an article titled "How sweet it isn't" for the L.A. Times

Dr. Robert Lustig, professor of clinical pediatrics at UC San Francisco, has a recorded lecture from 2009 on YouTube called "Sugar: The Bitter Truth." So far, his lecture has logged more than 2 million views. He personally has called for new taxes on added sugar and age limits for certain sweet treats. Interviewed April 1, 2013, on "60 Minutes", Dr. Lustig posited that added sugar is a "toxic" substance that has "created a public health crisis." He believes people should simply choose more food that doesn't have nutrition labels at all. He suggests we eat more real food.

SUGAR IS KNOWN BY A VARIETY OF NAMES - Thank you Sherry Brescia at www.greattastenopain.com for the following list of sugar's aliases

Agave
Barley malt
Beat sugar
Brown sugar
Cane sugar
Carob syrup
Corn sugar
Corn syrup solids
Corn syrup
Date sugar
Diatase
Diastatic malt
Dextrose
Ethyl Maltol
Evaporated cane juice
Fructose
Fruit juice
Fruit sweetener
Galactose
Glucose
Glucose solids
Grape sugar
High Fructose corn syrup
Honey
Invert sugar
Lactose
Malt syrup
Maltodextrin
Maltose
Mannitol
Maple sugar or maple syrup
Moslasses
Pancake syrup
Raw sugar
Refiner's syrup
Rice sugar
Sorbitol
Turbinado sugar
White sugar or sucralose

WHY DO WE CRAVE SWEETS?

Sugar triggers a human brain to release opioids and dopamine, "feel-good" neurochemicals. Some research suggests we can become addicted to sugar and physically crave it. Some have likened sugar's properties to the addictive qualities found in alcohol, cocaine and nicotine. In 2007, psychological researchers at Princeton University reported that when rats are fed sugar, they become dependent on the opioids ("feel good" neurochemicals) that their brains produce. These are interesting results that may also apply to humans. Check your head, I say.

SOME SWEET STATISTICS

- One teaspoon of sugar = 4 grams of sugar. I urge you, Read All Food Labels. And notice that fresh fruits and veggies don't come with labels. Only processed foods in boxes and cans and bottles come with labels. So read labels first to find out what you're considering consuming. Just because it's on the shelf, staring at you, begging you to buy it, doesn't mean it's going to be healthy to ingest over a long period of time. So, be wary of ingredients and know what the long words refer to. Do your own searching, of course. Knowledge is empowerment.

Ingredients are often measured in grams per serving. Most consumers eat the amount they want rather than what the 'per serving size' might be. Try this little experiment: Look on the label of a box of cereal and read the part about how they measure a single serving. It's usually in the range of 2/3 of a cup to 1-1/4 cups a serving. Take a measuring cup and see what they're talking about. Like me, you'll probably be surprised. I mean, I look at an empty bowl, and I fill it. I'm usually doubling or tripling the single serving as the company describes it. So, then I have to double or triple the ingredients and calories I'm consuming. It wouldn't take much to get up to 1,000 calories or more if you add in fruit, juice, a couple of cups of coffee with cream and sugar, and maybe toast with butter, cream cheese or jelly.

Often times, too, a single bottle of liquid refreshment is considered two servings by the company selling it. Don't just look at the calories. It may say 100 calories per serving but if you drink the whole bottle, it's counted at two servings which means you're consuming 200 calories, not 100 calories.

It's a little tricky at first, but once you understand what those labels say, then you can make the most informed choice for yourself.






The consumption of fructose or high-fructose corn syrup has be collated with heart attack risk, risks of cholesterol trouble - such as low levels of good (HDL: High density lipoprotein) cholesterol, raising blood levels of insulin and triglycerides as well as elevating blood pressure, weight gain, and type 2 diabetes

DOES SUGAR CAUSE CANCER?

What cancer researchers have discovered is that some cancers come equipped with insulin receptors. What this enables this type of cancer to do is act like a normal cell. Normal cells use glucose for energy. Cancers with insulin receptors now have that same capability. These cancers are now using glucose for their energy, just like normal cells. How do you fight a cancer that the body thinks is a normal cell?

REDUCING YOUR INTAKE OF SUGAR

To see if a product contains added sugar, you have to look in the ingredients list on the package for words such as “syrup,” “cane,” “sweetener” and “sugar,” as well as anything ending in “-ose.” Look for food products with the fewest grams of sugar listed under “Carbohydrates.”

Boost your natural sugar intake by buying fresh or dried fruits, or opting for frozen and canned varieties with no syrup. Use spices such as cinnamon and ginger and extracts such as almond and vanilla to give dishes natural sweetness.

The American Heart Association reports that you can cut the refined sugar in recipes by one-third to one-half without tasting the difference.

On a label of ingredients, always included on a side panel on all processed foods that come in boxes, cans or bottles, sugar is always listed in grams, often as 'gms'. Counting by four's, every four grams of sugar equals one teaspoon of sugar. 4 gms = 1 tsp. So, if one serving has 8 gms of sugar, then that would equal two teaspoons of sugar per serving.

- For humans, there may be a threshold level in the body below which sugar causes little or no harm... but once you pass it, health problems, including obesity, type 2 diabetes and cancer, are likely to emerge

- In the US, the average American eats 40 or more teaspoons of sugar per day. 40 teaspoons = 160 grams/day

- Added sugars make up 17 percent of the average American's diet.


- Sugar is highly addictive; limiting or eliminating your sugar intake is the most effective way to break free from this disease-causing cycle.

Check out this article by Dr. Mercola at www.mercola.com, "9 Foods with more sugar than a Krispy Kreme donut" by Dr. Mercola.
I also urge you to check out Dr. Mercola's website at www.mercola.com.

Some of the specific information being referred to can be found by copying and pasting the following into your browser: http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2013/11/16/9-sugary-foods.aspx

According to Dr. Mercola, luna bars, a latte, orange juice, yogurt, and certain restaurant salads and superfood smoothies have much more sugar than a doughnut.

9 Foods With More Sugar Than a Doughnut

While you may consider yourself savvy when it comes to spotting sugar-laden foods, the report revealed some real sugar shockers. Before we get into just how troublesome all of this excess sugar may be, let's first look at how stealthily it is hidden in some seemingly healthful foods.

Although added sugars represent 17 Percent of the Average U.S. Diet, when all forms of sugars are included, the data suggests that sugar makes up 38 percent of the typical US diet. Yikes.

The following nine foods all have more sugar than a Krispy Kreme doughnut:

Note: 1 Teaspoon = 4 grams

Krispy Kreme doughnut: 10 grams of sugar
Luna bar: 11 grams of sugar
Grande Starbucks latte: 17 grams
Subway 6" sweet onion teriyaki chicken sandwich: 17 grams
Tropicana orange juice, 8 ounces: 22 grams
Yoplait original yogurt: 27 grams
A&W Root Beer, 8 ounces, 32 grams
Vitamin Water, 20 ounces: 33 grams
Sprinkles red velvet cupcake: 45 grams
California Pizza Kitchen Thai chicken salad: 45 grams
Odwalla superfood smoothie, 12 ounces: 50 grams

In all, the major sources of added sugars in the typical U.S. diet are as follows:

Regular soft drinks (33 percent)
Sugars and candy (16.1 percent)
Cakes, cookies, pies (12.9 percent)
Fruit drinks (9.7 percent)
Dairy desserts and milk products (ice cream, sweetened yogurt and sweetened milk) (8.6 percent)
Other grain-based products (cinnamon toast and honey-nut waffles) (5.8 percent)


ALL CALORIES ARE NOT THE SAME!


LIQUID BEVERAGE CALORIES vs. SOLID FOOD CALORIES

It's now known that calories in liquid form are processed differently by your body than those consumed in solid form. Among added sugars, 43 percent come from sweetened beverages. Ingesting sugary beverages does not appear to impact the amount of calories ingested during a subsequent meal. In other words, those liquid calories count in terms of ingested calories, but they don't sustain any energy or offer any nutritious value and therefore are "empty calories" in the sense that the body doesn't count them in terms of nutritious value. After consuming a sugary beverage, you won't consume fewer calories the next meal, is the point. They are 'empty calories' because they contain no nutrients the body can recognize as nutrition. Mainly, sugar and caffeine simply rush into the blood stream almost untouched. Your body counts the calories as calories only; there's nothing nutritious there.

In contrast, when a solid food is consumed, the number of calories that were ingested in the following meal and in the following 24-hour period was reduced, suggesting the solid calories were processed in a different way, either in the intestine or in the central nervous system, so that the body appropriately adjusted its subsequent calorie intake.

In brief summation, with liquid beverages, the calories are "added on" to what the person would have ingested anyway.

Indeed, the notion that "a calorie is a calorie" has been firmly debunked by science. Not all calories count equally. And the "calories in, calories out" hypothesis for maintaining weight has equally been shown to be incorrect. It is in fact FAR more important to look at the source of the calories than counting them if you're trying to lose weight.

In short, you do not get fat because you eat too many calories and don't exercise enough. You get fat because you eat the wrong kind of calories. At the end of the day, your consumption of carbohydrates, whether in the form of grains and sugars (especially fructose), will determine whether or not you're able to manage your weight and maintain optimal health. This is because these types of carbs (sugar, fructose and grains) affect the hormone insulin, which is a very potent fat regulator. Fats and proteins affect insulin to a far lesser degree.


Natural vs. Added Sugar Thank you http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/usda-recommended-sugar-intake-8628.html

In different amounts, sugar occurs naturally in all foods containing carbohydrates, such as fruits, vegetables, dairy and whole grains. Since these foods also contain fiber and/or protein, your body digests them more slowly, resulting in a steady supply of glucose, or fuel, to your cells. However, many food manufacturers use added sugars to lend their products flavor and appeal and to extend their shelf life. These simple sugars digest quickly, causing blood glucose spikes and crashes.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not require manufacturers to distinguish between natural and added sugars on food labels.






UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE: GOVERNMENT RECOMMENDATIONS

The Institute of Medicine sets the recommended dietary allowance, or RDA, for nutrients. Since sugar isn’t a required nutrient in the diet, the institute has not issued an RDA for it. However, it does suggest that no more than 25 percent of calories come from added sugars – or between 38 and 55 percent of all calories taken from carbohydrates. In the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010, the USDA’s recommendation is more vague, advising that combined calories from saturated or trans-fats and added sugar be limited to 5 to 15 percent of total daily calories. On a 2,000-calorie diet, this would mean limiting yourself to between 100 and 300 calories from these two types of ingredients, but the USDA offers no separate recommendation for sugar.


SUGAR AND HEALTH

The calories that added sugars contribute to your diet can pack on pounds without your even realizing it, leading to being overweight. This, in turn, becomes a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. In addition, excess sugar consumption has links to high triglycerides, which can put you in danger of developing heart disease.

Given these health implications, the American Heart Association has issued guidelines for added sugar consumption. The association suggests that women get no more than 100 calories a day from added sugar, or about 6 teaspoons. For men, the association recommends limiting consumption to 150 calories daily, or 9 teaspoons.

GLYCATION


Glycation is reported to be a possible by-product of sugar consumption. Glycation refers to the stiffening of certain joint areas, such as those in your hands, fingers, arms, hips, knees, feet, and toes, as well as all along your spinal column, from coccyx (tail bone) to brain stem. Once glycation occurs and collects in these areas, it's very difficult if not impossible to reverse, leading to a stiffening of joints and the ligaments around those joints.


PROCESSED FOODS AND SUGAR

62% of what Americans consume is processed food.

Our western food choices favor processed foods, foods that are often high in sugar. Over the course of a lifetime, sugar consumption has been reported to be the culprit in advanced aging as well as a host of nutritionally related maladies. Hidden sugar can be found almost everywhere. Again, when you can, read product labels.

Maybe it's just me, but look at some of these stores that sell different forms of sugar. Cupcake and yogurt shops come to mind. There's a cupcake place that, I swear, the line is always out the door and down the street. It's a guilty-pleasure social-scene. Generally, we won't wait in lines for many things, but for sugar, we make an exception. Our social networking now depends on us doing that. And the latest sweet confection discovery is what everyone will be talking about tomorrow. I'm putting my money on frosting shots.

Of course, I've waited in those lines. So, I had to reprogram my brain, consciously. I have to be smarter than that part of my brain that is addiction-prone. At least, that's the way I look at it. It's an effort every day, believe me. But I undid it. I undid the damage I was doing to myself.


WHAT IS HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP, ALSO KNOWN BY ITS INITIALS, HFCS?


High Fructose Corn Syrup, also abbreviated as HFCS, refers to a sugar that is currently controversial because the sugar industry says it's just sugar while opponents claim it has hidden addictive qualities and is something akin to sugar on steroids. HFCS has a reputation whose jury is still deliberating.

Regardless of the controversy, sugar in all its refined forms when minimized in human consumption seems to be a health benefit. Humans who consume mass quantities of sugar every day of their lives in the forms of cereal in the morning, processed bread or pasta for lunch, rice, white potatoes and more bread for dinner. Plus sweets, cookies, snacks, energy drinks, energy bars, coffee drinks, soda, and 100% apple, orange or grape juice. Over a lifetime, one might make a connection between a lifetime daily consumption of sugar and the stiffening of a joint or two. Melt sugar in a recipe and you can see it crystallize and harden. I use that visualization when I think about the possible effects of sugar on body funtions. It's also been mentioned in type II diabetes as a contributor to pancreatic exhaustion. Just like a heart, if the pancreas is overtaxed, over time it will exhaust itself and at that point a person becomes a candidate for medical treatment.

I came to believe, because I felt the quality of my life depended on it, I had to be smarter than my eyes and mouth, smarter than my nose, ears and emotions, smarter than the average guy with the appetite of a bear. In short, I had to be smarter than my brain. I've come to believe that the amount of sugar in our western diet is tolerated so well because it tingles the same part of the brain that cocaine tingles. It's addictive, in my opinion.


WHAT IS ACIDIFICATION?

Acidification refers to the alkaline/acid balance, the PH balance, of the human body. If a body become too acidic, dis-ease can enter the body and express itself in a variety of ways. In an acidic body, there is almost certain to be chronic inflammation, and that includes the arterial and venal pathways that carry nutrient throughout our body, transfered by blood. And when our arterial and venal pathways, due to chronic inflammation, begin to show wear on the inside and begin to shred and these shreds, still attached to the arterial or venal wall, wave in the blood stream until good old cholesterol comes along and tries to repair the damage by patchwork. Once patched, if inflammation remains chronic, it becomes a little bump on the interior wall of your arterial or venal pathway. Over time, this bump can gather more chosesterol until there's a clot. If the clot can't be removed, it will eventually cause a blockage. That's when you hear about stents and quadruple bypass surgery.

WHAT'S THE SOURCE OF ALL THIS ACIDIFICATION ?

Soda in particular is very acidic. I was drinking a six pack of diet cola, every day. 12 oz cans. And then I'd swap a can of soda for a tall cup of coffee, another highly acidic drink. I loved that stuff. These two drinks coincidentally are exacerbators of mine. When I connect the dots: soda/coffee/acid/inflammation: It just makes sense to me because I've been with the stuff and I've been without it. Without it, I feel no pain. I miss soda and coffee, I really do; but I don't miss the pain.

Other sources of acid include citic acid in citrus fruit, especially the juices, and tomatoes and tomato juice (never mind the sugar content). I always eat just the fruit, never the juice (unless it's lemon juice squeezed on my fish).